DE Statement on Academic Integrity

Definition: Academic dishonesty is defined as, and is not limited to, cheating, plagiarism, fabrication of information, non-permitted collaboration on assignments, and misrepresentation of student status. Knowingly making false allegations of academic dishonesty against any student will itself be considered a form of academic dishonesty.

Process

In any case of suspected academic dishonesty, the instructor will initiate a meeting with the student. If an allegation of academic dishonesty is founded, the instructor will notify the student of the finding in writing or by email and send a copy of the notification, along with the evidence to the Graduate Program Director, where a file will be kept of all substantiated offenses. Each semester, the Graduate Program Director will report all offenses to the Academic Standing and Admission Committee of the College. See more specific details regarding first and second offenses in the section on Processes and Consequences of Academic Dishonesty.

General Evidentiary Policy:

The faculty member alleging academic dishonesty must present evidence to the student to support the faculty member’s finding. If the student chooses to appeal a finding of academic dishonesty, he or she must produce evidence to support the appeal. At each stage of the decision process, the student and the faculty member may present additional evidence that is directly relevant to the finding.

Course Withdrawal Restrictions:

Once a student is informed in writing of an allegation of academic dishonesty, the student may not withdraw from the course. However, if the student appeals and is found to not be in violation of the allegation, the student may then withdraw without penalty within five (5) calendar days after the student is notified of the decision (but only if the withdrawal deadline had not passed since the allegation was first initiated.)

Consequences of Academic Dishonesty

A determination of academic dishonesty will result in the imposition of the following sanctions, unless particularly severe or egregious cases result in the imposition of a higher level or other sanction(s).

First Offense: The graduate student will be required to meet with the instructor to discuss the alleged Academic Dishonesty offense.  The instructor will determine a finding in violation or not in violation.  For findings of “in violation”, the graduate student will be required to meet with the Graduate Program Director.  The student should be prepared to provide evidence during the meeting to explain his/her actions and whether disputing or affirming the instructor’s finding.  Before making a decision regarding the finding and consequences of the action, the Graduate Program Director will discuss the incident with the faculty member and student. Depending on the egregiousness of the offense, the student may receive a grade of zero on the assignment, fail the course, or be dismissed from the program.  The decision of the Graduate Program Director is appealable to the Dean for Academic Affairs, Graduate and Adult Studies (Dean).

 If the student fails to meet with the instructor or the Graduate Program Director, the matter will be resolved with the evidence presented and the student will lose the right to appeal the case any further.

To challenge an in violation finding by the Graduate Program Director, the student must submit their appeal in writing to the Dean. An appeal will only be considered if there is a clear demonstration of either an error in the original finding, the appeal process policy was not followed, or new evidence surfaced since the in violation finding was made that could possibly change the outcome of the prior decision. Additionally, the appeal letter should include any evidence the student expects to submit to the Dean.  Students have 7 calendar days from the date on which the in violation finding by the Graduate Program Director was made to submit an appeal to the Dean.  Once an appeal has been submitted, the faculty member will be invited to respond to the appeal documents, and then a meeting with the student, instructor, and Graduate Program Director will be scheduled with the Dean.  The decision of the Dean is final.

Second Offense: The graduate student will be required to meet with the instructor, Graduate Program Director, and Dean to discuss the student’s alleged violation of the Academic Integrity policy. After examining the evidence provided by the instructor and discussing the matter with the student, the Dean will determine whether or not the student was in violation of the Academic Integrity policy. If the student fails to appear at the meeting with the Dean, the matter will be resolved with the evidence presented, and the student will lose the right to appeal the case further.  A decision in support of the in violation finding will result in a failure in the course and the student will be dismissed from the program.  The decision of the Dean is appealable to the Graduate Curriculum and Academic Standing Committee.

 If the student fails to meet with the Dean, the matter will be resolved with the evidence presented and the student will lose the right to appeal the case any further.

To challenge an in violation finding by the Dean, the student must submit their appeal in writing to the Graduate Curriculum and Academic Standing Committee, clearly demonstrating that there was either an error in the original finding, the appeal process policy was not followed, or new evidence surfaced since the in violation finding was made that could possibly change the outcome of the prior decision. Additional, the appeal letter should include any evidence the student expects to submit to the committee.  Students have 7 calendar days from the date on which the in violation finding by the Dean was made to submit an appeal to the committee.  Once an appeal has been submitted, the faculty member will be invited to respond to the appeal documents, and then a meeting with the student, instructor, Graduate Program Director, and Dean for Graduate and Adult Studies will be scheduled with the Graduate Curriculum and Academic Standing Committee.  The decision of the committee is final. 

Identity Fraud

All forms of academic dishonesty are considered serious violations of the ethical standards of the University of Dubuque, but one that is considered particularly egregious is identity fraud. Any student who has another person impersonate him or her, or in any other way commits identity fraud in any course, exam, or other academic exercise, will be dismissed from the school. Whether a first or second offense, the student should follow the appeal process identified under the Second Offense outlined above.