Psychology

The University of Dubuque Psychology major provides students with the academic and professional tools needed to achieve success in a wide range of occupations.

What You Will Learn

  • An ability to understand how psychologists ask and answer questions, as well as giving you a broad background in psychological theory and findings.
  • An ability to understanding where these questions come from and how they are answered means understanding that psychology is the scientific study of behavior and mental processes.
  • Students will learn how psychology as a discipline emphasizes critical thinking with regards to scientific theory and evidence.

Program of Study

A University of Dubuque degree in psychology prepares students to have a sound knowledge base in important facts, concepts, theories, and issues in psychology. Students will learn to understand the scientific basis of psychology; develop the critical-thinking skills necessary to evaluate the adequacy of current research and theory in psychology; and understand the role of ethics and values in contemporary psychology.


What Our Students Do

The University of Dubuque Psychology Program allows students the opportunity to pursue a psychology major as preparation to enter careers in human services or go on to graduate school to become counselors and therapists. Other students combine psychology with a second major, such as criminal justice, biology, or communication. 

Where Our Graduates Go

University of Dubuque psychology graduates go on to graduate school to become therapists, industrial psychologists, or forensic psychologists. Other students go directly from college into careers in human services.

News from the Department

During J-Term 2014, six members of the University of Dubuque Psychology Club attended the Hawaii International Conference on Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences in Honolulu. Senior Amy Steve presented a paper at the annual convention of Alpha Chi in St. Louis, March 29, 2014. 

Psychology - Program of Study

The courses below are a program sample of what students may encounter. Students will meet with their advisers to develop a personal educational program to plan their elective course choices, internships, undergraduate research, and other educational opportunities and experiences.

Year One

Fall Semester
PSY 110: Introduction to Psychology (3)
WVS 101: World View Seminar I (3)
CIS 101: Introduction to Computers (3)
COM 101: Speech Communication (3)
ENG 101: Composition and Rhetoric (3)

J-Term
Required

Spring Semester
PSY 132: Critical Thinking (3)
REL 110: Judeo-Christian Journeys (3) (or other REL)
UDHS 121:  World Civilization (3) or other Global Awareness A Course
PSY Elective


Year Two

Fall Semester
PSY 220/PSY 223/PSY 227: Child Development/Adolescent Development/Adult Development and Aging (3)
UDMA 112: Algebra (4) or other Math course
BIO 125: Population, Resources, and Environment (3) or other Stewardship course
ENG 112/260: Literature (or other ENG) (3)
BIO 110: Human Biology and Lab (4) or other Science Lab Course

J-Term
Recommended

Spring Semester
UDMA 230: Introduction to Statistics (3) 
WVS 201: World View Seminar II (3) 
ART 111: Survey of Western Art (3) or other Aesthetics B course
PSY Elective
RES 104: Introduction to Research Writing (3)
HWS 110: Physical Activity (1)


Year Three

Fall Semester
PSY 243: Using APA Format (3)
PSY 333: Research Methods in the Behavior Sciences (3)
PSY 310: Social Psychology (3)
PSY Elective
PSY Elective
HWS 110: Physical Activity (1)

J-Term
Recommended

Spring Semester
PSY 337: Learning and Behavior or PSY 338-Cognition (3)
PSY 363: Cross-Cultural Psychology(3)
UDLS 111: Elementary Spanish I (or other Global Awareness B Course) (3)
PSY Elective
PSY Elective


Year Four

Fall Semester
PSY 351: Theories of Personality (3)
PSY Elective
PSY Elective
PSY Elective
PSY Elective

J-Term
Recommended

Spring Semester

PSY 476: Empirical Research Project or PSY 485: Internship (3)
PSY 495: Senior Seminar
PSY Elective
PSY Elective
PSY Elective

 

Mark Stevens
Mark Stevens
Psychology Department Head; Professor of Psychology

PhD, Bowling Green State University
MA, Bowling Green State University
BA, Baldwin-Wallace College

Office Phone: 563.589.3239
E-mail: mstevens@dbq.edu 
Office Location: 316 Severance Hall
Fax: 563.589.3416

Biography - Click Here

Education:
PhD 1980 Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, Ohio 43403
Emphasis: Life-Span Developmental Psychology
Dissertation: Hypothesis-testing in elderly as a function of task concreteness and memory condition.

MA 1976 Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, Ohio 43403
Emphasis: Life-Span Developmental Psychology
Thesis: Attribute identification as a function of age, homogeneity ratio, and response label.

BA 1973 Baldwin-Wallace College, Berea, Ohio
Major: Psychology
magna cum laude

Courses Taught:
Adolescent Development; Adult Development and Aging; Social Psychology; Research Methods in the Behavior Sciences; Learning and Behavior; Cognition; Behavioral Genetics; Psychological Testing; Human Sexuality; Theories of Personality; Psychology of Gender; Senior Seminar

Professional Experience:
1984 -Present:
Professor of Psychology, and Chair Department of Psychology
University of Dubuque, Dubuque, Iowa

1981-1984 
Assistant Professor of Psychology
Ohio Dominican College, Columbus, Ohio

1978-1981 
Visiting Instructor
Psychology Department
Illinois College, Jacksonville, Illinois

Professional Associations:
American Psychological Association
Division 2: Society for the Teaching of Psychology
Division 24: Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology
Midwestern Psychological Association

Hobbies:
Photography:
Participant in group exhibit: Powerful Ideas in Photography: Archie Lieberman and His Students (September, 1999)

Singing: Member of Dubuque Chorale


Kristi Fens
Kristi Fens
Adjunct Psychology Faculty


E-mail: kfens@dbq.edu 

Henry Grubb
Henry Grubb
Professor of Psychology

PhD, Virginia Tech
MS, Virginia Tech



Office Phone: 563.589.3847
E-mail: hgrubb@dbq.edu 
Office Location: 310 Severance Hall
Fax: 563.589.3416

Carol Smart
Carol Smart
Adjunct Psychology Faculty

MA, Loras College
BS, Illinois State University

Office Phone: 563.589.3182
E-mail: csmart@dbq.edu 
Office Location: 319 Severance Hall
Fax: 563.589.3416

Careers in Psychology

A wide variety of entry-level jobs are open to psychology majors.

BS Opportunities

A psychology major can provide entry into a variety of careers, including residential counselor with developmentally disabled children/adults, caseworker in hospitals and county agencies, housing and student life coordinator, labor relations researcher, customer services representative, employee relations assistant, lobbying researcher/organizer, legislative aide, and institutional researcher/historian.

Post-graduate Opportunities

Some students with psychology majors have gone on to graduate school to prepare for careers as psychotherapists, researchers, and college teachers. Other students have pursued graduate programs in industrial psychology, and forensic psychology.

Successful Outcomes

Kelly M. Koppes, BS, 2007 Psychology

I currently provide supported community living services for several people with disabilities, as well as act as an alternate program supervisor.  In addition to teaching social skills, anger management, cleaning skills, behavior management, and support and self-advocacy skills, I assist my consumers with hiring and scheduling of their support staff, provide crisis interventions, and I am responsible for reporting their progress on their goals to the Department of Human Services. To keep up with new information, studies, and interventions related to people living with disabilities, I have found it useful to look to scientific studies done in this area. Knowing how to read and think critically about these types of studies assists me in determining how I can use new information to help my consumers in their daily lives.  I learned these research and critical thinking skills as part of the UD Psychology Program.